Young Radio Greenhorn, Meet Larry Lujack

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXCERPT FROM MY MEMOIR “RAISED ON THE RADIO” WHICH I LOOK TO RELEASE IN 2018.

As last week’s post stated, I was about to interview for the job to be Larry Lujack’s producer on WLS AM. Larry called and recruited me for the interview and I was both excited and scared shitless.  

It was time to take the elevator up to the 5th floor of the Stone Container building and get buzzed in to the WLS lobby by the receptionist. I told her I was there to see Larry Lujack and a quick inter office call later, Larry was walking towards me. I asked to see his so called “Golf Hickey” he got the week before. On the snowiest, coldest day of the year, with a wind chill of more than forty below zero Larry Lujack made news by playing 18 holes of golf. The day got so cold and icy that chunks of slush stuck to his neck under his scarf and left something similar to freezer burn or a golf hickey as he called it. That golf stunt earned Larry a mention on Paul Harvey’s nationwide radio news show. This was a badge of honor for Larry Lujack as he was a huge fan of Paul’s.

Second to the right, the Stone Container Building, home of WLS.

Larry led me down two hallways to his office. Taking seats there I saw this was a hoarder’s paradise of old newspapers, magazines and other mess inducing items. Larry explained there was a need to hire someone who thought more like him, someone who could write in his voice and trite as it may sound “hip the show up a bit.” He explained the hours, starting with me being there at 2 a.m. to go through the newspapers and finding the most interesting articles and writing the entertainment items for his Cheap Trashy Show Biz Report and Animal Stories.

Then Larry turned things over to see what my story was. I told him like so many others have said in the past, he was the reason I was in the radio business to start with. Larry joked, “Hey, don’t blame me for YOUR messed up life!” I filled in some more of my background and interests as Larry listened intently.

Now here was the key moment in this meeting between the major market radio superstar and the young radio greenhorn. We were talking about the Cheap Trashy Show-biz report and I had the insane balls to tell Larry he missed the best part of a story he covered that morning. It was dirt on major league pitcher Dave Stewart who was arrested for getting into a hassle with a transvestite prostitute. Larry did the story on both his early and late in the show reports but left out a key item.

He asks what was missed. I said “The name of the transvestite hooker, it was Lucille! You could’ve mentioned her name then gone straight into the Little Richard song “Lucille.” Larry looked stunned. Had the great Larry Lujack been scooped? No way! So he starts rummaging through the mess on his desk looking for the newspaper clipping. I told him it was in the Sun Times. (Again, me being the media junkie, I was all over this story) Larry found the Sun Times report and sees that the hooker WAS named Lucille. For the next minute he kept saying “Damn, shit! (pause) Goddamn it! I can’t believe I missed that!”

Now who in their right mind has the stones to tell Larry Lujack that one of his bits could have been better and he missed something that should have been talked about? That’s like some back-up singer auditioning to be in Paul Mc Cartney’s band saying, “Um, Paul? I think that last verse you sang on ‘Hey Jude ’was a bit off. Try it this way.”   I didn’t care. This was my chance to shine and I sure did with this scoop and the way I played it.

1980’s promo pic of Larry Lujack

As we were winding things down I asked “Any problems with what you’ve seen, heard or smelled from me?” Larry laughed loud and said, “No, things are good and I haven’t smelled any odors coming from your body.” He liked my self-deprecating approach which was the path Larry himself often took.

I was given numbers of what the job would pay to start and more information would be discussed if I got the gig. He also noted this wasn’t a job guarantee but I was definitely the “leading candidate.” Larry also said if I get any other job offers before he makes his decision to let him know so he could consider matching it. This whole scenario was just so hard to believe. Larry Lujack is telling me he’d be willing to get in a bidding war to secure my creative services! He also qualified things by saying, “Now if someone wants to pay you two hundred grand for some job, I’m gonna tell you, “See ya and good luck.”

The famed Superjock walks me out and says he’ll call once he makes up his mind. This was at the end of January and lord only knew when that decision would happen. I figured it might be a few weeks but who knew? This was new territory for me.

From the day of that interview with Larry Lujack I was on a constant alert, waiting for a phone call from the famed Superjock. Anytime after ten a.m. when his show ended, if the phone rang at home, I’d wonder if it was Larry calling to offer me the producer’s job. This was in the days before caller ID, voicemails, cell-phones and texting. A simple call was all that was needed. Even when I’d be out all day and come home, I’d wonder if there was a written message to return Larry’s call. It was a tense time and I tried to shift my focus to my job at WKDC, my newspaper column, the record hops Jim and I did and my work at the record store. I even kept my eyes and ears open for any other job offers I could land that would force me to call WLS and tell Larry, ”Hey, got an opportunity here, what’s your story?” That didn’t materialize.

Finally time moved along to Tuesday morning March 26th 1985. I was in bed listening to the Lujack show and he left half an hour before his ten a.m. stop time. Larry was feeling sick and went to his office. Tommy Edwards came on early and even got an on air report from producer Mick Oliver that the morning show star was lying on his office couch on top of a pile of old newspapers. So Tommy takes things from there and I turned off the stereo. Around 11:00 a.m. the phone rang and my dad picked up the downstairs line at the same time I picked up the extension in my room. We both said “Hello?” and after a pause I hear “Oh, sounds like I got stereo.” I’m thinking this might be Larry so I speak his name and he says “Hey.” So I tell my dad I got it and he gets off the line.

Larry asks how things are and I’m like, “O.K.” and after a pause he asks “Do you want a job?” I blurt out, “Yes, I certainly do!” With that I was hired! Larry was hoping I could start working for him the following Monday and I said that would be no problem. All of this was of course a huge rush and big relief for me. Two months of waiting was over and I had the job of my young lifetime! There were details to work out so Larry asked me to meet with him that Friday and we’d lock up everything. I was given his home phone number just in case anything came up that I needed to let him know about. We get off the line and I went nuts with a scream and a huge ‘Woo hoo!” ! I’m going to be working for my favorite radio personality who also happens to be the king of Chicago radio!

NEXT WEEK- My first day on the air with Lar.